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reports on the impact that each navy made during the war, from union naval support of numerous battles, including vicksburg and new orleans to the confederates use of naval mines and the militaristic deployment of a submarine. it's a little under an hour. >> good evening, everyone. last time we met here on this very stage to talk about the civil war, jim, you are looking to finishing touches on your new book. you are preparing your publication as well. now i have to do this the way they do it on the talk shows. now, james mcpherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberla
and confederate navies, 1861 to 1865, and craig's civil war at sea, both very handsomely done, and it's good because we get to resume our conversation. we barely broke the surface. let's get right to it. because we spoke for an hour last time and we got to about january of 1862. so i'll assume you all know about 1861. and get to something that jim pointed out in his book, which i found rather interesting, and that is that 150 years ago this month, eye side from all the other things going on, including the first shudders of the realization that lincoln had actually promulgated an emancipation proclaimation. the blockade was in force in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers seem to belong the north, not the south. and it must have seemed for a time in 1862 that this combination of events, particularly the naval successes for the union, were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line changed. the father of water that lincoln boasted now flowed unvexed
zumwalt and what i think is important about his life. because, sure, he is the father of the modern navy, but there's so much more to him and so much more to the lessons that i think i'm able to portray in my book. bud zumwalt is remembered as a trailblazer who reformed the navy, and he was a champion of the men and women who served in it. that's a given. he was the iconoclastic admiral who brought a navy drifting towards the shores back into safety. into the channels of the 20th sent -- century. and nothing would ever be the same again. as bill clinton and admiral mullen say at the back of my book on the dust jacket blurbs, the things that he did as a reformer will never be undone. and i'm not talking about whether they are bell bottoms or trousers or side burns, those things can be changed. but the way he reformed the social policies and made the navy response to the contemporary needs of society and what he did with respect to vis-a-vis the soviets during the period of the cold war and the strategic arms limitations and his role there. these are things that have left a mark in history
lost their sons. when i called rocky to right, a navy football player, linebacker type. he wasn't sure how he was going to find his voice either but since we were classmates and company mates i said rocky, you were a casualty evacuation pilot and you saved over 150 marines, soldiers, iraqis and three deployments. you honor jen harris, another academy graduate. you honored ronnie winchester when you make the story. let's find your voice. we wrote this book to give a podium to people who are too humble to speak about service, who do their job day in and day out nobly and don't have a bestseller and don't go out into "the new york times" and write their stories. they are too proud and too prideful. so i cajoled rocky as i had this vision of leading the stories together. i knew what i wanted. what i wanted battlefield bullets, feeling the pressure of combat and they're in this book that i also wanted to have universal attributes of partnership and diplomacy that we saw from 9/11 and till now in 2012. here's something from rockies story. i experienced several close calls while flying during
was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet. many battleships to it was the fourth largest navy in the world. and churchill was very worried that if france was conquered, then hitler would see these the french fleet. and the arithmetic was if you put the german fleet, which was considerable. they had the bismarck coming along, together with the italian fleet which was an ally of the germans and at a considerable fleet in the mediterranean, if you then put that together with the french fleet which was the fourth largest fleet in the world, now you have a navy that was larger than the british fleet. and if that happened, it's a game set and match for britain. they couldn't have controlled the sea lanes to the island. it was going to be over. so churchill implored him to keep fighting because he was worried about the french battleships. but the french army was totally in disarray. very overwhelmingly conquered, and a certain element in france decided it was better to try to come to an agreement if it was the germans about how they could then drop out of the war. an interesting litt
of world war ii the royal navy was the world's biggest navy. also was irrelevant. it was powerful but they didn't understand aircraft carriers, they underestimated submarines and they thought battleships were still central to maritime operation. the royal navy does nothing worth remembering in world war ii. is a total drain on the british. when mitt romney was talking about the size of the navy during one of the debate, i thought you want to read paul kennedy year. just because we have a big powerful navy doesn't mean it is the right navy. what you want of a relevant force? april and force down the road is going to look very different than it does today. but i think the place to begin with pretty severe budget cuts that make people stop and think. >> we have had so many great questions and i know we can go all night but we only have time for one more and tom will talk to a lot of you individually as well. you, sir. >> perfect segue. i'm a navy captain of the naval academy. also co-founder of a forum to study warfare and wondering if you could comment or everything what you said ab
the united states, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea. so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. it's smaller than a destroyer, um, around 300 feet. and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could, it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic, and the convoys consisted of troop ships and supply ships for the war effort. but if they, if they made contact with a u-boat, they could break off, and then they could pursue that u-boat. when you look at the record, though, i mean, 70 u-boats, they probably were, without question, the most successful antisubmarine vessel in the fleet. this ship is the uss slater. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyer esc
guy, he kept saying i know exactly where the fourth bomb is. the u.s. navy didn't listen to him. they had 20 ships there by this time. they were checking the bottom of 120 square miles of the mediterranean. ten by 12 miles, and they couldn't locate the bomb. he said, i know exactly where it is. they didn't want to listen to him. what does he know? a guy who goes out fishing every day knows exactly where he is like you know you are sitting in your seat, and i know i'm standing up here. he knew exactly where that bomb came down. no one listened to him until later. meanwhile, we got a much bigger problem as it turned out. two of the bombs, as i said, their parachutes were badly singed or burned. they came down too fast. one of them came down just fine, but all three of them came down on a little town, 250 families. agricultural in the prosince of el maria, and they grow tomatoes, and, by the way, this sounds familiar because the town is back in the news lately. i'll tell you about that in a minute. one bomb came down just fine. came down slowly, settled down, but two of the bombs,
until our pane arrived in memphis that morning to an airport to an air force base to a navy base that had more landings than i think o'hare airport had that morning. it was busy. the kennedy administration did not want to lose out on this one. anyway, when you're appointed to be a security officer in such a situation, you keep notes. they're blase, they're telephone numbers, names of people who today we call persons of interest. people who didn't look like students. every night i had to report to the fbi for anyone that might have come into oxford and checked into a hotel that didn't look like he belonged there. so i kept those notes, and then i looked at them over the years. i started this book ten years ago. and i started talking to people that were in my unit, and they provided me with anecdotes. and i looked over old newspaper sections, i looked over old magazines. started piecing things together. ken burns said you look at a photograph long enough, the photograph comes to life. the person that has a life before that snapshot and has a life after that, and you begin to, again
about the british navy did after world war i, britain had won that war, don't say sharply the navy, capital ships, sailors and the like. however, the government agency running the navy increased in size. so he came with parkinson's law and that his organization said expand, the amount of work they have to do and have nothing to do with their size beard if you let them expand their will. on the case of government any other organizations left alone will fall into this, lucite but why they were created to become self-interested, inward turning. the nice thing about free markets as if you have a company that does that, you cease to exist. you don't have the government to keep you going. >> if you were the president, you go to zero-based budgeting. >> it's more than budgets. it's great and the environment for entrepreneurship can flourish. for example, one of the things we discuss is degrading the value of the dollar. it's about consumer price index. it's about coercion. suddenly your government takes resources from you without taxation, without borrowing. it disrupts contracts you may
between the united states and europe. the president ordered them built in 1940 but the navy decided that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. i think, if you look at the record you will see that probably was a good idea. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. is smaller than a destroyer, around 300 feet and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic and the convoys consisted of troop ships and supplied ships for the war effort but if they made contact with the u-boat they could break off in the naked turso's -- ers to that u-boat. when you look at the record, 70 u-boats, they probably were without question the most successful anti-submarine festival on the fleet. this ship is the uss later. it was built in the tampa shipyard for 563 to destroyer escorts build and 17 shipyards all across the country. this was 1944. as they had
.s. continue to dominate the western pacific, the navy and air force to the same degree that it did throughout the cold war in the post cold war the philippines and australia in particular to bear some of the burden. that's what i mean by an empire. i'm going to let the audience discover for your questions with the major conclusion of the book is the latest want to ask you before we turn it over what you -- you are walking away from america's historical a central role of the superpower, and you are talking about inevitable, necessary, a decline, and how would you respond. they want the american influence to extend long into the decade that they cannot do that bearing the same level of burden. of vladimir putin against china at the same time that what countries like vietnam and the philippines drag us into a war with china, over the sea is so azoff plater balancing triet in any case, the u.s. has so much oil deposits in texas, louisiana, oklahoma or other places i can name but we are doing to be -- because of energy reserves we are going to be a significant power for decades to come in any case
scaled back, the navy has been scaled back, the army increased margely, but it it's budget was vastly increased. where did the money go? and i think this is a crisis that we're enduring that is going have to require both liberals and conservative to rethink re-examine some of the sacred cows and say we can't afford to say this is off the table for cuts. that's off the table for cuts. nothing is off the table but particularly the waste going on. but also it's not just that they have thrown a lot of money out the window. it's the way they do it. there are two techniques they use to sort of get the taxpayers spigot going. we have so we got political engineering where by once a program gets going, a missile program, a weapons program, it doesn't matter if the enemy that it was made for no longer exists. it doesn't matter that the thing can't really work as promised, the point what you try to do is get the project spread out as many congressional districts as you can particularly with congressman who have to sit on proposeses -- appropriations committee. the profit and the jobbings get spr
set of invisible eyes. he went to the recruiting station. he watch the navy and the navy had one line and go to the line, and the psychological exams. he watch the coast guard who had two lines and the first was for your physical exam, and the psychological exam. for your eye exam and figured that would give just enough time to slip the contact lens in his eye which he did and the recruiter said read the bottom line. he said how far down? as far as you can read. what are you reading? the bottom line. you are reading patent pending. you have the eyes of an eagle. that was just how so many people, so many sailors that i interviewed, they did it because of patriotism, because it is the right thing to do and, we sent them to see in a new and untested vessel that the navy fought additionally was a colossal waste of money. no warship had ever been manned by an african-american crew and the first warship to be managed by an african-american crew was the uss mason which was a destroyer escort. franklin roosevelt wanted to do something to end racial discrimination in the military and industry
into the navy has so much power that he can't capture manhattan. one ship of the line had more artillery firepower than the entire american army. people forget how powerful the ships were so she's sitting there and at that time there are no helicopters and no cars and no television and no computers he gets a note from the french army that is sitting and says the admiral of the french navy sitting in the caribbean believes he could come north for six weeks now, the entire upper kennedy was created because washington had the courage a year earlier to send a one-third of his army to the south to fight general cornwallis. he won the victory in greensburg north carolina that cost him so much that he said to his staff to more victories like this and we will not have an army left and they were just gradually tearing up his army and he retreats to yorktown in despair expecting the navy to save him. washington has gotten this note. the french march river to new york and the general says i am under your command. they manage to mask the british in manhattan so they don't know that he is on the move
of going over with traditional forces and being around americans. we would live with two marines, one navy corpsman -- three marines, one navy corpsman and 80 afghans on a base. you want to talk about a complete culture shock, i got one. we did everything with these afghans from eating to drinking to building volleyball courts to mission planning to hearing about their stories of their lives. and it really helped us become a solid unit, and we learned to depend on one another and rely on one another. and i want to talk about the afghans later on because of what the current events are. but i have to tell you one of the best lessons i think this taught me was, is not to look at the world and not to judge people by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. because, you know, i have to tell you, i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. that's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's how it was taught. i'm 4, and i know t
, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if, if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. .. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyed air escorts built. seventeen shipyards all across the country. it actually came late in the game, like a lot of them. this is 1944. it did a few escort's back and forth across the atlantic. one interesting thing that the slater did do, the only nazi submarine, the only you-book captured by the americans and will work to was captured by destroyer escort. they get a treasure trove of material, conference of documents, actually a half a ton from this you -- u-boat 505. one of the torpedoes was loaded on to this letter and brought back to america for study along with the all important in the machine, and that was the codebreaking machine. and it actually was
on the union side? >> roughly 150,000 southern slaves fought in the union army or navy during the war. about 185,000 african-americans and all and about 80% of them were from the south. there is talk about african-american slaves fighting for the confederacy there is no evidence of this whole taken by their owners by the very end of the war there is a discussion about whether the confederacy in order to preserve its rebellion and to enhance its military capacities of to try to enlist slaves. the recognition by anybody that thought about it is that you couldn't do that without abolishing slavery that the very end of the war. the confederate congress does have an emancipation bill provides an enlistment but no guarantee of emancipation but the war ended before it could go into effect. the only other case is the louisiana native guards regiment of free people of color in new orleans who initially set for the confederacy that as soon as the union army moves and it invades the side, so i know there is talk about this as an ex able of the loyal to what i've never seen evidence that is compelling.
? >> guest: well, roughly 150,000 southern slaves fought in the union army or navy during the war. about 185,000 african-americans in all, and about 80% of them were from the south. there is talk about african-american slaves fighting for confederacy. there's no evidence for this. there are some slaves who end up in the confederate army taken by their owners as basically body servants. by the very end of the war, there was the discussion about whether this confederacy in order to preserve its rebellion, and to enhance its military capacities ought to try to enlist slaves. the recognition, by anybody who thought about it was that you couldn't do that without abolishing slavery. at the very end of the war, the confederate congress does pass an emancipation bill that provides for enlistment, but no guarantee of emancipation, but the war ended really before it could go into effect. the only other case is the louisiana native guards, a -- a regimen of free people of color in new orleans, who initially support the confederacy, but as soon as the union army moves into new orleans, they switch sides
who clutched pouches they made from the scrotums of dead vietnamese. the navy patched up their heads in action. the haight beckoned across the choppy cold waters of the bay. on christmas eve went strolling in the hippie haven he'd rented figures reform might magazine. he wasn't looking for sex, but for mystical camaraderie. it's a harder connection to find in the states. as he walked on haight streak of us have ratty looking speed freaks for fun of them, hustling anyone who went by. when a past, jitterbug scratch, trying to pull in peer she broke away, but the navy men's high-end lst fix them with a look at data backed up the woman. after vietnam mozilla became not sure to mccarthy was only enhanced by the acid. 20 yards past, mccarthy heard a loud scuffle from the sharp crack of a gunshot. as he spun around, the young man stumbled past shutting i got a shot me. the kid who ventured into the haight from a suburb to score drugs have been shot through the five p. it's not an interaction, durable for shoulder for his frantic girlfriend was reading it her father seabird. mccarthy's intro
can't win the war by direct assault. he's sitting outside new york. the royal navy has so much power that he can't capture manhattan. one ship of a line had more artillery firepower than the entire american army. people forget how powerful these ships were for their time. and so he's sitting there, and at a time when there are no helicopters and no cars and no television and no computers, he gets a note from the french army which is sitting in rhode island which says the admiral of the french navy sitting in the caribbean believes that he could come north for six weeks. now, the entire opportunity was created because washington had had the courage over a year earlier to send one-third of his army to the south to fight general worn wallis and wear -- cornwallis and wear him out. cornwallis won a victory in greensboro, north carolina, that cost him so much that he said to his staff two more victories like this, and we won't have an army left. and they were just gradually tearing up cornwallis' army, and he retreats to yorktown in despair expecting the royal navy to save him. and washin
that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after the war, even 27% died on them. more people died on prison ships than died in all the battles but after the war nobody does anything about these prison ships filled with bones. they are still riding the ferry to manhattan and saying hey i can see these ruins out here and all of these bones are on there. wittman is writing editorials in the 18 30s and 40s saying that we have to do something about this. we have made a memorial for general washington all the beautiful statues on wall street but nobody has done anything for the people of the general washington to donate big business funds and of course on the ships there is n
. not until our planes arrived in memphis that next morning to an airport, an air force base or a navy base that had more landings i think that o'hare airport had that morning. it was busy. kennedy administration did not want to lose out on this one. anyway, when you are pointed pointed to pointed to be security officers which in its situation keep notes. you keep notes and telephone numbers, license plates, names of people or today we call them persons of interest. people who didn't look like students. every night i had to report to the fbi for anyone who might've come into -- checked into a hotel who didn't look like he belongs there. so i kept those notes and i looked at them over the years. i started this book 10 years ago. i started talking to people who were in my unit and they provided me with anecdotes. i looked over old newspapers, looked over old magazines. started piecing things together. ken burns says, look at a photograph on and off. the photograph comes to life. the person that had the life before the snapshot will have a life after it and you begin to again, put things toget
. ike played a real, key role in that, didn't he not? >> admiral -- [inaudible] navy admiral who said during world war ii, what was his line? we learned to burn them scientifically, you know, was in favor of modern or warfare. and he wanted to use tactical nuclear weapons as did john foster dulles, as did richard nixon when the french were losing. they felt this was the time to use tactical nuclear weapons to sort of rescue the situation. ike listened to that, rejected that advice, never really tipped his hand what he was thinking. this is one of these moments when he had to decide because the french position was, obviously, precarious and losing. and ike made the decision, one, not to get involved, to send b troops in. he famously said the jungle will consume the army by divisions, so he did not want to put in ground troops, and he thought about but rejected the idea of using tactical nuclear weapons. okay? back to you. >> was there any effort after stalin died early in the presidency to attempt to reset the relationship? >> yes. >> you mention add two-year interval. >> this is an im
so i joined the naval rotc and then was a navy attorney for four years and -- >> was that during vietnam? >> it was during vietnam, that's why i was being drafted actually. within a week of going to the peace corps i received my 18 classification for notice of physical, so guess what i and future had in store for me. after i got out of the navy i was a federal prosecutor in los angeles, u.s. attorney's office. prosecutor standard cases, bank robberies, drug cases, didn't think about it much. in the the petting a unit prosecuting fraud against the government, fha, va, that sort of thing. after that was in the private practice of law, business litigation for five years of appointed to the bench, so i was on the bench for 25 years as a judge and now i'm retired and i'm running, as you say, for office. >> what court were you a judge? >> superior court in orange county california, or the state court and over 25 years, pretty much did everything. and as a part of that, you know, and to see turning low-level drug offenders through the system for no good purpose, and eventually in fact i
of the joint chiefs, navy admiral said in world war ii, what was the line? we learned to burn them scientifically, you know, was in favor of modern warfare, and he wanted to use tactical nuclear weapons as did john foster dulles as well as richard nixon when the french were losing at the end. they felt this was the time to use tactical weapons to try to rescue the situation. ike listened to that. rejected that advice. never really tipped his hand at what he was thinking. this is one of the moments when he had to decide because the french's position was procare yows and losing, and he made the decision, one, not to get involved sending ground troops in saying the jungle will come soup the army by division so he did not want to put in ground troops, and he thought about, but rejected the idea of using tactical nuclear weapons. okay? back there. >> any effort after stalin died early in the presidency to attempt to reset the relationship? you mentioned the two year interval. >> this is an important moment. sal lin, of course, used to talk about the inevidentability of the conflict with
outside of new york. the royal navy has so much power, he can't capture manhattan. one ship of align had more artillery fire power than the entire american army. people forget how powerful the ships were for the time. he's significant -- southeast -- he's sitting there there are no helicopters or cars or television. he get a note from a french army sitting in rhode island, which said, thed admiral of the french navy sitting in the caribbean believes he could come north for six weeks. the entire opportunity was created because washington a courage year over to send one-third of the army to south to fight general corp. wallace and wear him out. he won a victory at the court house in north carolina that cost him so much he said to his staff two more victories like this and we won't have an army left. they would gradually tearing up cornwallis' army. he retreats expecting the royal nay destroy save him. washington has gotten the note. the french march from rhode island over to new york, french general said i'm under your command. they managed to mask the british in manhattan. they don't know
or evangelical white males. some sexuality is characterized by wearing navy blue or gray suits with red ties, frequent church attendance, and public denunciation of other homosexuals. many occupy positions of authority and it can beat -- in can be found working as republican school board members, republican activists, a christian men's group leaders and republican legislators. prominent homosexuals include roy aspirin and larry craig. ted haggard. >> prominent. >> we will do a couple more. >> donald trump. >> well, he might be in the book. >> we to have the entry for asshole. [laughter] >> i think that's why we put an end. >> any individual at a bar, party, or other social function having more fun than you. also include those who are dating attractive women to make more money than you, or manage to handle everything life throws at them with composure. often have great, loving families to use proper grammar, know about want to exercise regularly to make wise financial decisions , donate to charities and read books. >> people have their lives together. >> is newt gingrich in your? >> that guy
the change the course of history, navigation error with the radar and the royal navy lt. that was guiding the boats was not working at that time, they were headed for the wrong objective which was an objective for the rangers, it was a cliff on the other side of omaha beach, they were not going to pointe du hoc. all the landing craft or heading in the wrong direction. at that time they were supposed to land at 6:30 a.m. the air or bombed pointe du hoc. if the rangers had landed at the time they were allocated it would have all been killed by their own bombers. they were at the wrong point and they were headed to another place. the fifth ranger battalion assigned to pointe du hoc beefed up the mission to 1,000 men, could not get in contact with the second ranger battalion at that time. every one of the radios didn't work. they went to their secondary objective, we did ten minute and went to their secondary objective and landed on omaha beach exactly at the right time and place they were supposed to end change the course of the events because they were the only reserve force at the time. me
president nixon promised $10 million in aid as well as promising to loan army and navy helicopters for the search-and-rescue missions. the american public move by the depth and station began donating supplies and money to the people of peru. similarly empathetic pat wanted to help. during a weekend at camp david the couple discussed the situation and dick raise the possibility of pat personally filled the frame donations from the american people down to peru. a week later she flew to peru and matt consuela gonzalez d. velasco wife of the peruvian president to deliver donations, visit the injured and homeless and review the damage. she took with her over 18,000 pounds of clothing blankets and other goods as well as cash donations. during her brief stay she accompanied ms. velez going to tour the most devastator regions. on a small plane sitting on every purpose kitchen chair with no seatbelt. walking amid the rep will she hug the children enough comfort to those who had lost everything. her genuine concern and sympathy did much to ease the tension that had existed between the u.s. a
army unit the navy is assigned to the marines and we are mixed up and we work together. cited a couple two hours but a couple of normal day's issue were called you take apart a car bomb and we had a stretch of a lot of car bombs every day. of those 50 we managed to take apart one of them. 49 detonated. and then it is like scsi you figure out what it was, who the target was there and collect evidence day by day and put it in a report and you did that every day. the mission is if we cannot stop the car bomb or the idb then everybody comes home all 30 of us went together and we will come back. my whole unit came back together. i was very lucky. at home i had a completely average experience. and i am not comfortable speaking for any veteran. everybody fought there own war and reacted differently but my experience is i had trouble thinking about anything other than grief, the fear has what kind of person m i that came, as much as this year of being in any surrounding. i knew i was safe in my head but not in my gut but you come home and i got out of the military. i elevated eight years. your
almost now have an admiral for every ship in the navy. it's not a captain, and admiral. so what we do is go through and look at areas where we could not necessarily save all of the money, but we could transfer responsibilities that are not truly the defense of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >>> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet at book tv >>> about a month left in 2012 many publications are putting out their year-end list of notable books. book tv will feature several of these lists focusing on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in the "washington post" best books of 2012. ..
that were part of the navy, you had to figure out am i citizens or subject of. who is going let me in to their territory? no one -- see, people neglect the southern hemisphere because it's so much easier. >> i'm sorry? >> there's no water. easy to cycle across australia. >> well, people have done it since. the first man to walk across -- walk around the world goes over australia. with a mule. an at that point, this is 20th century. he could get food and water more easily. yes, the surface travelers, i must say, are some of the touchest, if not the most mean-spirited people in the world. you have to be that way. it's hard to do both physically and i think socially to put yourself at risk constantly like that. it's a bloody-minded thing to do. i'm not -- i don't sense among people you're going go off and do it. [laughter] any time soon. or maybe so. >> [inaudible] the dangers and the -- i guess what -- what did both -- what are some do you have some stories about the local people how they reacted to these adventures and how they may have supported them the government? are there other
, a pseudonym for one of the navy seals involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden is that the book's publisher, i believe was penguin press, they announced that with only weeks to spare, and i felt at least that they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. of course, it doesn't help or perhaps it didn't hurt, depending on who you ask, that mark owen's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which then caused a fire storm and the like, but the upshot is many of the books, even with commensurate media attention, it doesn't translate into sales. where "no easy day" did phenomenally well. what's worth pointing out, too, anything to do with the killing of osama bin laden is back in the news again with the upcoming movie "zero dark thirty" directed by katherine bigalow and written by mark bowel, those responsible for "the hurt locker," and it's interesting to see that the cia's been cooperating, and, also, whether the account of the movie conflicts with the account in mark owen's books that conflicts with the act of bowden's book, piecing this together to piece together a
of history. navigation error of the radar in the world -- royal navy was not working at that time. they were headed for the wrong of jacket. it was a cliff on the other side of omaha beach. they were not going to pointe du hoc. all of the landing craft were headed in the wrong direction. at that exact time they're supposed to land at 6:30 a.m. the airport bomb pointe du hoc. if the rangers had landed at the time they were allocated, they would've all been killed by our own bombers. they were at the wrong point and they were headed towards a different point. the fifth ranger battalion which was assigned to the pointe du hoc, beef up the mission to about 1000 men, could not get in contact with the second ranger battalion at that time. every one of the radios didn't work. it went to their secondary objective. they waited 10 minutes and they went to their secondary objective and they landed on omaha beach, exactly at the right time and place they were supposed to. they changed the course of events. because they were the only reserve force at the time. meanwhile, force a which was the second rang
for one of the navy seals who is involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden and the book's publisher, penguin press announced that with only weeks to spare. i felt that the state did a brilliant job of marketing a book. of course it didn't help were perhaps it didn't hurt depending on who you ask that markers real name was dutifully revealed that the media, which then caused its own firestorm. but the upshot is many of these books, even can insert needy attention doesn't translate into sales. where they did phenomenally low. the other thing that is worth pointing out, too, is anything to do with the killing of osama bin laden is back in the news again with the upcoming movie zero dark 30 to wreck it by kathryn bigelow and written by mark bowles, the same people responsible for the hurt locker. it's interesting to see the cia is cooperating, but the account of mark owen spoke. so taking all these things together, piece together a comprehensive of what happens is redoing rashomon. >> guest: according to wired list, it did not do well in the commercial sense, did not crack our top 481 w
worked for president kennedy. those who vote for him and served in navy and knew him as a friend. they all have their own take and interpretation of what happened, their own spin. now it is the term of president kennedy. a principal speaker tonight, of which we invite you to listen to. it is that of president kennedy. many see this is the one president kennedy never had the opportunity to write. it is now my great pleasure to introduce the individual who is most responsible for his writing and publication. it was caroline kennedy who first conceived the idea of the book that presented some of the most compelling and fascinating excerpts of these publications. it was caroline who championship championship -- champion it. in caroline's eyes, she had detail and accuracy. she is the author of nine bestseller books on politics and poetry. you can make that 10 best-selling books. we just learned that her new book is on "the new york times." [applause] caroline serves as the president of the kennedy library foundation which provides the financial support for this library. at her request
cases. practical british goals of eliminate the german navy come or the french objective of limiting germany as a land-based threat received wilson's support so that he could institute a league of nation. a feel-good toothless unmotivated group of international elite. but wilsonian idealism did play a central role in reshaping postwar europe map. as william ashman millions of people were moved around the continent like chess pieces and borders were changed by client on etch-a-sketch. one participant called people under discussion quote abstract lumps. another warren quote, the phrase national self-determination is simply loaded with dynamite. it will raise hopes that can never be realized. think of the misery it will cause, unquote. british diplomats walked into a study to find david lloyd george, and woodrow wilson bending over a giant map spread on the carpet. he said, quote, they are cutting the baghdad railway. clemens with his hand on the map looked like a gorilla of yellow ivory. it is upholding these ignorant and irresponsible men should be cutting asia minor tidbits, as if th
was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these books with commensurate mia attention translated to sales. the other thing that i think is worth pointing out is anything to do with the killing of osama bin laden he is back in the news again with the upcoming movie zero dark 30 directed by kathryn bigelow and written by mark bowl, the people responsible for the oscar-winning movie the heard walker. is interesting to see that the cia has been cooperating and also whether the accounts of the movie conflict with the accounting mark owens's book which conflicts with the account of mark bonetin's book, trying to piece together a comprehensive attack by a flattened is like redoing raja lawn. >> accor
an admiral for every ship in the navy. not a captain, and admiral. what we have done is go through and look at areas where we could not necessarily save all of the money but we could transfer responsibilities that are not truly in defense of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's index. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our freedom our conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comical doctor and author and senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now on booktv thomas stanton argues the difference between companies that successfully made it through the 2008 financial crisis and those that didn't was willingness of upper management to listen to feedback before making decisions. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon and welcome to the cato institute's. i'm the director of financial regulat
of the pioneers in figuring that out. if she did not take commissioned steamships or part of the navy you had to figure out, who am i ss and are subject of and to is going to let me into their territory. no one -- see, people really neglect the southern hemisphere because it is so much easier. >> there is no water. howdy you do it? across this chilean. >> well, people have done it sense. the first man to walk around the world does go over australia with a mule. and at that point this is the 20th-century. at that point he could get food and water more easily. but yes, the surface travelers, i must say, are some of the toughest, if not most mean-spirited people in the world, but you have to be that way. i mean, it is hard to do both physically and, i think socially to put yourself at risk constantly like that. it is kind of a bloody minded thing to do i don't sense among people you're going to go off and do it any time soon. maybe so. >> you mentioned the dangers and the -- i guess, what did locals or what are some -- do you have some stories of what the local people, how they reacted to these
and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on t
to the norway end of long island. where they were taken by a u.s. navy ship, carried to new london, connecticut, and thrown in jail. charged with murder and piracy. now, as soon as word got out that these africans had come ashore, abolitionists from up and down the eastern coast flocked to the jail to try to assist them, thinking this cause might help them to advance their struggle against the institution of slavery. well, a long legal battle took place, for 19 months the amistad africans were in jail. they did receive support from no less a person than john quincy adams, former president, at that time congressman, who represented the 36 survivors before the united states supreme court, and won a dramatic victory. declaring them illegally enslaved and, therefore, free, and enabling them to return to their native land, which they did, eight months later, in november 1841. they returned to southern sierra leon, faking with them a group of missionaries, and this is the origin of the american missionary association. who would then create something called, the menda mission. here we have an image of
't have a law against inciting mutiny in the navy. that would mean you couldn't have a law against people jumping up and down in a courtroom and screaming. we know that there were limits to the speech they would protect. but the language doesn't tell you what those limits are. you have then to go back to the history of the practice or the can customs of the times to find out what those limits are. >> host: the, i want to pick up on that, but also one other thing here. you talked, this seems to me to continue from bickell to some degree, that the institutions and traditions of the american republic including the historic constitution are our best chance for happiness. and you express concern throughout your writings about the eroding or wanton destructions of our traditions. can you expand on that at all? >> guest: well, can i explain -- >> host: expand, or -- >> guest: well, the traditions, we have had traditions of what is proper behavior, what is civil behavior and what is decent behavior. and those traditions are eroding rapidly. you only have to look at television to see that intense
that i went law school, and it was being drafted i joined the naval rotc and was a navy j. a. g. attorney during vietnam. that's why i was being drafted. within a week of getting back from the peace corp. i received my notice of florida. guess what my future had in store for for me. i was in a federal prosecutor in los angeles. i prosecuted standard case, bank robbery, drug cases didn't think about much. ended up heading a unit prosecuting frauds against the government. after in in the private practice of law business litigation for five years and appointed to the bempleg. i was on the bench for twenty five years and now i'm retired and running for libertarian office. >> what court were you a judge? >> orange county, california. the state court, and over twenty five years, pretty much did everything as a part of that, you know, churning low level drug offenders through the system. it didn't take long that it wasn't working. robbers, rapers, murders being able to state and get a lot less accountability because we're spending the . >> what was your attitude toward drug lawbreakers, i guess?
. >> at think that to prison ships better off what is now the brooklyn navy yard, to prison ships have something like 11,000, it's an estimate. people bynum. and again, that points. they're not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial for singularly. but, yes, those prison ships, washington protested the malta the war. people on the ships were not being fed, barely being fed to my dying and the ships. and if you got off, if you were an officer or if you had some money, but if you were neither of those things you died on them. and after the war even, you know, 47% unease. >> well, more people died in prison ships than all the battles. but after the work noted does anything about these prison ships. and people write in the ferry to manhattan. hey, i can see these folks out there, hoping runs. all of these bones are on a. and woodman is writing in the 1830's, 40's. we have to do something about this. we have made a memorial for general washington and all the business. by a beautiful statue down on wall street, but no one has done anything for the people who are not general washin
american man of their world was william c. whitney, who had been secretary of the navy under grover cleveland. he had also been quite taken with mrs. randolph while he was married, and his wife made a big fuss about it, so that was the end of that. and then his wife died in the late 1880s--early '90s, actually. and so whitney married edith randolph and morgan took up with her best friend, who was a woman named adelaide louisa townsend, who was quite a wonderful person, not as beautiful as edith whitney--edith randolph whitney, but very energetic and full of life and a real match for him in her appreciation of art and travel, and she was sort of a wonderful spirit. i met someone who had actually known her, an older woman who knew her. and also i met--i eventually met her grandson, which was a lot of fun 'cause he could tell me quite a lot about her life and the house that she lived in on park avenue. and he said that park avenue. and he said that there was a special back entrance for mr. morgan and that the children were told to disappear when mr. morgan arrived. i mean, there--beca
that out if you didn't take commissioned steamships for instance are part of the navy, you have to figure out, hua mei citizen or subject to and who's going to let me into their territory? [inaudible] >> see, people really look like the southern hemisphere because it's so much easier. [inaudible] >> well, people have done it since. the first man to walk around the world does go over australia with a mule. and at this point commences the 20th century so he could get food and water more easily. at the surface travelers msa are some of the toughest if not most mean spirited people in the world. but she got to be that way. i mean, it is really hard to do physically and socially to put yourself at risk constantly like that. it's a bloody-minded thing to do. i don't sense among people you're going to go off and do it any time soon. or maybe so. >> to have some stories about the local people, how they reacted to these adventures and how they may have supported them in the afghanistan government i guess. the details of the difficulties that the people they encountered quite >> constant, constant.
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